insanelygaming:

Game Beemo 
Created by Rachel Marie

insanelygaming:

Game Beemo 

Created by Rachel Marie


hollerdumped:

Pipes

hollerdumped:

Pipes



(via mirahxox)


whiteguykarate:

Kickboxer (1989) | Jean-Claude Van Damme

whiteguykarate:

Kickboxer (1989) | Jean-Claude Van Damme

(via 80s-90s-stuff)


Q
I have a crush on you
Anonymous

lilmsfatbottom:

Good morning! Starting the day off right…


tastefullyoffensive:

How to exit the back of a pickup truck. [via]

(via vaginal-erection)


preppybiologist:

rhamphotheca:

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction
by Elizabeth Palermo
Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.
A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…
(read more: Live Science)
photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

I met one of the few arapaima researchers last year (Dr. Don Stewart from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry). He’s a cool guy: he loves these fish and he hates the declines that he’s witnessed. He just wants people to understand why they’re important and why conservation matters. Plus, he does some awesome citizen science by getting the natives involved!

preppybiologist:

rhamphotheca:

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction

by Elizabeth Palermo

Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.

A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…

(read more: Live Science)

photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

I met one of the few arapaima researchers last year (Dr. Don Stewart from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry). He’s a cool guy: he loves these fish and he hates the declines that he’s witnessed. He just wants people to understand why they’re important and why conservation matters. Plus, he does some awesome citizen science by getting the natives involved!

(via ichthyologist)